Fiction with a business bent.

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Patrik Goethe via Unsplash

Are you a business book junkie?  I am.  And over the past few years, I’ve seen my reading list become more and more weighted towards non-fiction.  With limited reading time, it just feels like I get more intellectual bang for my buck with fact-based works.

So Rohit Bhargava’s thoughts on why reading fiction is better for your business were a nice reminder for me: taking time for a wider range of reading material enhances your creativity, stimulates your intellectual curiosity and changes your perspective.

Following Bhargava’s lead, here are my own recommendations for powerful fiction with a bit of a business bent.

 

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald – This literary classic is a must-read story of greed, money and ambition in the 1920’s. Gatsby is the iconic American entrepreneur, a self-made man blinded by love and the pursuit of wealth.

 

 

Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates – The tragic portrait of a couple unable to reconcile their real lives with the lives of their dreams. Trapped in jobs they never particularly wanted – The Housewife, The Company Man – they struggle against their suburban and corporate conformity. Not exactly light reading, this.

 

 

The Alchemist by Paolo Coelho – On a brighter note, this allegorical story of a young shepherd’s search for his Personal Legend presents the value of being open to learning, to trying new experiences and to finding meaningful work.

 

 

 

And I’ve said before that AMC’s Mad Men has a wealth of business insights mixed in with all the drama, so here are three fun Mad Men related titles that I’m putting on my Christmas list.

         

 

(This post contains affiliate links to Powell’s Books.)

 

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4 thoughts on “Fiction with a business bent.

  1. ashokbhatia

    One of my favorites has been Arthur Hailey. Whether it is ‘Airport’, ‘Hotel’, ‘Overload’ or ‘Moneychangers’, the insight he provides into the inner machinations and external challenges of each industry is highly instructive. Invariably, the main protagonist is no. 2 in the hierarchy, unable to execute his vision through most part of the narrative. Towards the end, a crisis gets resolved, getting him the top job.

    Reply

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