Tag Archives: Interviewing

What is your management philosophy?

Week 1 of 52 2010 by F Delventhal

How many pennies would it take to fill this room?

Have you ever had an interview question like this?  Did it stop you in your tracks?

Employers use these seemingly crazy questions to see how well you can think on your feet and whether you can reason through a tough problem.  Here’s a more common, but equally tough, question that can stump both new and seasoned managers alike:

What is your management philosophy?

This one can be difficult if 1) you’re not sure what the interviewer is looking for or 2) you’re not used to articulating your core beliefs as a manager.

First, as with the penny question, the employer wants to know you can provide an organized and reasoned response.  They also want to know if your management style will fit with their organizational culture and whether you understand how your leadership impacts overall performance.

Second, it’s important to distinguish between management actions (what you do) and management philosophy (what you believe and why).  Rather than listing tasks, think about how your management style creates a more effective and efficient organization, and focus on the results of your approach.

Stuck on where to start?

Consider working around the 4 basic management functions: planning, organizing, leading and controlling. (Remember those from business class??)

Planning
• How do individual and team goals correlate to organizational goals?
• What’s your decision making style?

Organizing
• Do you have a preferred team structure?  Why?
• What’s your foundation for distributing authority?

Leading
• What do you believe drives individual motivation?
• What are major sources of conflict within a team and how do you address them?

Controlling
• How does evaluation relate to performance?
• What are your options when individual or team results are not in line with expectations?

 

How about you?  Have you ever been asked about your management philosophy in an interview?  How did you respond?

 

For more thoughts on the interview process, try these posts:

To Hire, or Not To Hire: Evaluating Sales Skills

To Hire, or Not To Hire: Evaluating Cultural Fit

To Hire, or Not To Hire: Evaluating Locus of Control

 

(Photo by F Delventhal via Flickr, licensed under Creative Commons)

 

Revised from original post – July 4, 2013

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To Hire, or Not To Hire: Evaluating Locus of Control

locus of controlThis is the third in a three-part series on identifying great candidates through the interview process.  First, we talked about evaluating candidates on their sales skills, even when hiring for non-sales roles.  Then we explored how to determine if a candidate fits within your organizational culture.  Now I want to talk about what I think is the single most important thing to look for in a candidate:

Internal Locus of Control.

Okay, I realize “single most important thing” is a bold statement.  But before I make my case, let’s make sure we’re on the same page as to what locus of control is all about.

Locus of control is an element of personality referring to the extent to which individuals believe that they control the events that affect them.  Individuals with an external locus of control believe that results derive from external factors – other people, situational factors, fate.  Individuals with an internal locus of control believe that results derive primarily from their own actions – from within themselves.  As with other personality traits, locus of control is measured on a continuum.  While none of us are ever all one way or the other, we generally tend toward one end of the spectrum.

What does this mean in the workplace?  Individuals with an internal locus of control believe their actions directly impact outcomes.  They have an attitude of personal responsibility and take ownership for their actions.  They are goal oriented and are persistent in problem solving.  Where individuals with an external locus of control are looking for someone else to tell them what to do, those with an internal locus of control feel empowered to make decisions and act on their own.

How do you identify candidates with an internal locus of control?  Using specific questions can be difficult and a bit transparent.  (You can try a locus of control test here)  So the key is to listen for locus of control cues throughout the interview.  You should be alert for repeating patterns in the candidate’s responses:

External – Excuses, blaming, rationalization, focus on obstacles

Internal –
Optimism, persistence, ownership, recognition of obstacles but focus on how they are overcome

I’ve found the following questions, and particularly the elements in bold, useful in eliciting locus of control cues:

What are your professional goals for the next 2-5 years?  What steps have you taken toward reaching them?

What were the weakest areas on your last performance review?  What actions have you taken to improve those areas?

What are you most proud of?  Why?

Of your previous jobs, which was your favorite?  Why?

How would your former teammates describe your work style?  How would they describe your approach to problem solving?   (I like this type of question because people are more likely to give their true opinion when speaking for others.  Again, listen for actions taken and interpretations of end results.)

As I said, I believe internal locus of control is the most important thing to look for in a candidate.  Not because skills and experience are not important.  They are.  And you have to weigh the importance of each in the context of your business needs.  But the reality is that no candidate is ever perfect.  So at some point, you have to look beyond the resume.

In my own experience, my best hires – individuals who proved great at their jobs and added the most value to the organization – were not the perfect candidates for the positions I hired them for.  They lacked an advanced degree or their experience was in an unrelated industry, for example.  But I believed these candidate had the confidence, persistence and drive to succeed.  I felt they could master the specific tasks of the job over time and their willingness to learn, to perhaps struggle but keep trying, would help them take the job to the next level.  They had an internal locus of control.

 

What do you think?  I’d love to hear your thoughts on locus of control.  And do you have a favorite interview question?  Please share it in the comments.

 

(Photo credit: Microsoft)